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Manage NuGet Package Sources using PowerShell

If you regularly need to manage your NuGet package sources in Visual Studio, and got familiar to using the NuGet Package Manager Console for all kinds of operations and automation, you might find the following approach appealing.

This approach will save you a few clicks and is based on a very cool tools package called ManagePackageSource. This NuGet package installs a few extra PowerShell commands into your NuGet PowerShell profile. That’s right, NuGet supports its own PowerShell profile! So instead of installing these tools packages over and over again every single time you create a new solution, let’s simply install these commands once and for all, so they are always available.

To do so, simply run the following command:

Install-Package ManagePackageSource

You should see the following output in the NuGet Package Manager Console

2012-05-30_2306

 

After that, you can simply uninstall the package again from your project to undo the changes in your working directory. The commands have been installed into your NuGet PowerShell profile and the profile has been reloaded, so they will remain there even without ever needing to install this package again.

If you happened to have another instance of Visual Studio open before installing this package, you can reload the profile as well in this other instance by running the following command in the NuGet Package Manager Console:

. $profile

In case you’re wondering where we changed stuff on your computer, you can find the NuGet_powershell.ps1 profile in the C:\Users\username\My Documents\WindowsPowerShell\ directory, and the new ManagePackageSource module can be found under the Modules directory inside that one.

To register a new NuGet feed into your Visual Studio, for instance a MyGet feed, you can run the following command now:

Add-PackageSource "My MyGet feed" "http://www.myget.org/F/myfeedname/"

If you're interested into the sources, you can obviously unzip the NuGet package or browse the code on our GitHub repository. Feel free to contribute your own extensions and improvements!

MyGet support for multiple logins (and GitHub)

Last week, we’ve deployed a major update for MyGet. Next to support for pushing packages to other feeds and the new MyGet Gallery, we’ve done some updates to our authentication mechanisms. From now on, you can link multiple social identities to your MyGet account. For example, I’ve linked Google, Facebook and Windows Live ID to my own account so I don’t have to think about which account I have to use to login.

MyGet GitHub SupportAs a bonus we now also support GitHub as an identity provider. This enables you to log in to your GitHub account and be logged in across all GitHub related websites using a single sign-on experience.

You can set up these multiple identities (and GitHub) on your profile page. Follow the Add identity provider hyperlink and complete the process.

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Happy packaging!

Introducing MyGet Gallery

Included in our latest release of www.myget.org last week, we’ve deployed the new MyGet gallery. We’ve noticed a lot of NuGet packages for popular open-source projects (such as Dotspatial or Mvccontrib) are hidden in their continuous integration feeds on MyGet. To make it easier to find these hidden treasures, we’ve released the MyGet Gallery.

The MyGet Gallery enables you to browse around through selected public feeds and browse packages listed on those feeds. It’s an initial release of this feature and we’re looking forward to hearing your comments through our UserVoice.

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Get your feed listed, too!

You can opt-in to be listed in the MyGet Gallery too. Simply navigate to your feeds and edit the settings under the MyGet Gallery tab. You can select to be either listed or unlisted in the MyGet Gallery. It’s also possible to add a logo of choice.

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Happy packaging!

Pushing packages from MyGet to NuGet (or another feed)

Imagine you have a package repository hosted on MyGet. Every time a team member of your open source or enterprise project commits source code changes, your build server pushes an updated release to this package repository in the form of a prerelease NuGet package. Now what happens if a release to the official NuGet package source has to be created? Typically, you will either create a fresh package which will be the package to release, or download a package from your build server, change the version and upload that one to NuGet.org (or another repository). No need for such overloaded process anymore: MyGet will perform the push for you.

Setting up a continuous integration (CI) feed

First of all, you will need a CI feed to which your build server can push every NuGet package related to your project. Simply create your feed on MyGet, a three-second process. After creating your feed, MyGet will present you the feed URL as well as an API key. Optionally, you can make it a private feed and ensure only people who were granted the correct privileges can access your feed.

Next, configure your build server to push the NuGet artifacts to MyGet. Using TeamCity, for example, this can be done by adding a NuGet Push build step:

MyGet feed TeamCity

Pushing packages from MyGet to NuGet (or another feed)

The first time you want to push a package to another NuGet feed, you’ll probably have to configure the other feed’s URL and API key to use when pushing there. The push package feature is based on the package source proxy feature released earlier. Navigate to your feed and on the left hand side, click the “Package Sources” item and either add a new package source or edit the existing, default NuGet package source. In order to be able to push a package to another feed, the API key has to be specified. You can enter your NuGet.org (or another feed) API key and click the Save button.

MyGet package source selection

Pushing packages from MyGet to NuGet or any other feed is easy. From the moment a package source has been configured, using the “Push” button will enable you to push packages to another feed.

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After clicking the “Push” button, MyGet will present you with an overview of the package which will be pushed to another feed. Select the feed to which you want to push and verify the other fields. When pushing a prerelease package to a stable package, simply make the Prerelease tag field blank. You can also modify the prerelease tag if wanted. If you do intend to push a prerelease version, simply continue clicking the “Push” button.

Push a NuGet package

Told you it was easy. MyGet will now push the package to the selected feed and inform you by e-mail should anything go wrong. Happy packaging!