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Setting default package sources during build

MyGet gives you the option to specify one or more package sources for a feed. Package sources for a feed are also available during every build on MyGet Build Services. This can be really useful!

  • An additional package source is needed during build. MyGet will make the package source available during build if it has been added to the feed's package sources.
  • If you have an authenticated feed but do not wish to add credentials to source control, credentials can be added to the feed's package source. These credentials will be available during build and allow you to consume a protected feed with ease.
  • The API key for a package source is also transferred to the build server. This means during a build, you can call into nuget.exe push and push packages to configured package sources.
  • You want to make use of nuget.exe push in a build script without having to specify the -Source parameter.
Setting default package sources during build

The NuGet.config on our build machines is configured using NuGet's defaults, enriched with all package sources configured for a feed. Based on these defaults, the following conventions are active:

  • The default package source is set to (Aggregate Source), meaning all feeds will be queried for packages in the order defined in the feed's package sources.
  • The default push source (when using nuget push without the -Source parameter) is NuGet.org.

Both of these conventions can be overridden by editing the build source configuration:

Setting package sources used during a build with NuGet

Happy packaging!

Checking NuGet package vulnerabilities with OWASP SafeNuGet

Edit - October 14, 2016 - We have a new, integrated vulnerability scan service.

A couple of days ago, OWASP released a new NuGet package which is able to check known vulnerabilities in NuGet packages. Use of libraries with known vulnerabilities can be an issue for software and components you create: check the excellent whitepaper "The Unfortunate Reality of Insecure Libraries". In the OWASP Top 10 2013, consuming vulnerable packages is listed under A9 Using Known Vulnerable Components.

There is a simple solution to this: by installing one additional package in your projects, automatic checking for known vulnerabilities can be done. The SafeNuGet package contains an MSBuild task which will warn you about this.

A repository with vulnerable packages and the reason for that can be found on the SafeNuGet GitHub project. When running a build which references vulnerable NuGet packages, the warnings list will contain some information about this as well as a link with some explanation:

Checking package vulnerabilities

And of course when such library is built using MyGet Build Services, a warning will also be displayed in the build log:

MyGet build services security scan

It would be great if the build would fail entirely when such package is found, right? Well, that is a simple configuration parameter for the SafeNuGet package. Find the SafeNuGet.targets file and update its contents to:

<Project ToolsVersion="4.0" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003">
  <UsingTask AssemblyFile="SafeNuGet.dll" TaskName="SafeNuGet.AreNuGetPackagesSafe"  />
  <Target Name="AfterBuild">
    <AreNuGetPackagesSafe ProjectPath="$(MSBuildProjectDirectory)"
         CacheTimeInMinutes="10" DontBreakBuild="false" />
  </Target>
</Project>

Want to make sure known vulnerabilities are shown in your builds? You know the drill:

SafeNuGet

Happy and safe packaging!

Specifying which projects get built with MyGet Build Services

Using MyGet Build Services, you have the opportunity to control exactly how your project gets built. By default, several conventions are used to run builds. MyGet will scan the contents of your Source Control Repository looking for a file which it can work with. In order of precedence, the following files are searched for:

  • Project files (*.csproj, *.vbproj, ...) specified in the build source configuration.
  • MyGet.bat, MyGet.cmd or MyGet.ps1
  • build.bat, build.cmd or build.ps1
  • MyGet.sln
  • Any other *.sln file
  • *.csproj (and *.vbproj, etc)
  • *.nuspec

With the latest deployment of MyGet Build Services, it is now possible to specify which project(s) to build, per build source configuration.

MyGet Specify Project to Build

The projects to build can be C# or VB.NET projects or solutions. Based on the files found, the build process will be slightly different. See the documentation on MyGet Build Services for more information.

Happy packaging!

Migrate away from MSBuild-based NuGet package restore

Back in the days...

NuGet package restore used to be MSBuild-based. You had to explicitly enable it using the context menu on a Visual Studio solution: right-click the solution and select Enable NuGet Package Restore. In fact, if you go to the NuGet docs, you'll see that this scenario is still fully documented. A quick search for "package restore" will throw this old scenario "in your face", as it is the first hit in the search results.

First hit in search results when looking for Package Restore on the NuGet docs

To be fair, the page does highlight that there's a new way of doing this. But many people don't read. At best some look at the pictures. That's why I won't even include a screenshot of that page, as it is full of project setup details that no one should ever go through again. Instead, I'll give you a clear picture of what you should not do :)

Don't do this!

You're doing it wrong!

I can't stress it enough. I'm a huge proponent of NuGet package restore! But if you follow this workflow, then please do it right! (and design for failure, obviously).

The MSBuild-based NuGet package restore has issues. For one: it's MSBuild-based. This means that anything that happens during package restore is run within the MSBuild process, which is particularly annoying for packages that want to modify project files and inject MSBuild targets (as these aren't picked up until the next run).

The moment you manually enable NuGet package restore through the context menu, you're actually installing a few NuGet packages: NuGet.Build, which depends on NuGet.Commandline. The nuget.exe along with a nuget.config and a nuget.targets file are created within a .nuget folder, and all projects that have NuGet package references will be modified to import the NuGet.targets file. The nuget.targets file ensures that nuget.exe is invoked during builds (as in: not before builds!).

The right way

All you need to do is to make sure that your Visual Studio options allow NuGet to download any missing packages in a pre-build phase (note: even before MSBuild compilation starts!). I'm not going to rephrase step-by-step what you should do as David Ebbo already has a great post explaining all of this!

Ensure NuGet is allowed to download missing packages

If you're cloning a new project that did not commit any NuGet packages (and is not using the old MSBuild-based restore), then it just works!

Migrating from the old way

If you still have a .nuget folder in your repository, then please migrate away from it! Think about all those adorable kittens...

Did you know this has been documented on the NuGet Docs all along?! Follow this how-to and save yourself and everyone using your codebase some trouble and follow it step-by-step.

But... my precious (build server)

Here you go: set this environment variable to true and be done with it.

EnableNuGetPackageRestore=true

The following tools support the new automatic package restore out-of-the-box and Just Work™!

The next list of tools requires some minor modifications to the build process:

  • Visual Studio Online / Team Foundation Server (how-to)
  • TeamCity (how-to)

Note that you don't need to worry about development machines! As long as you all have the latest NuGet Visual Studio extension installed.

Upgrading your NuGet extension is generally a good idea anyway, as there are lots of improvements in the latest versions!

Going forward

Here's what I'd love to see happen going forward:

  • The NuGet Docs should by default show the new non-MSBuild-based package restore instructions. There are close to none, but this should be thrown in your face when looking for it.
  • Migration instructions should be clearly linked to.
  • The old MSBuild-based instructions should be archived, perhaps even removed.
  • The context menu-item to manually enable NuGet package restore (MSBuild-based) should be completely removed from the extension. I don't see any reason to keep it. Do you? If you do, please comment on this CodePlex issue, if you agree, then vote for it :)
  • Preferably, the next NuGet Visual Studio extension detects you are using the "old" restore option when you open a solution, and asks you to migrate/upgrade to the new way. Ideally, this removes the targets and import statements, and custom package sources and credentials are taken into account if they are in the nuget.config file.

I'm happy to take on an issue or send PR's for any of the above, but some of the bullet-points seem too big to me to be taken in as a PR.

Join the Global Windows Azure Bootcamp 2014

Global Windows Azure BootcampIt’s no secret that MyGet is running on top of the Windows Azure cloud platform. Because we love it and want to get as many people to learn about it, we’re participating again in this year’s Global Windows Azure Bootcamp.

In April of 2013 the first Global Windows Azure Bootcamp was held at more than 90 locations around the globe. This year’s bootcamp will again offer a one day deep dive class to help thousands of people get up to speed on developing Cloud Computing Applications for Windows Azure. In addition to this great learning opportunity there will be a hands on lab in which everyone can participate. A huge global compute farm will be created by attendees to perform diabetes research!

If you want to learn about Windows Azure or help in diabetes research, find a location near you and join this massive event on Saturday, March 29, 2014. MyGet is giving away a free 2-month Starter subscription to every attendee, and other sponsors are offering swag and licenses as well!

Happy packaging in the cloud!

MyGet Documentation site redesigned

When we first launched the MyGet Documentation site, we decided to fork the NuGet documentation site and apply our own colors and content to it. After our website redesign a few months ago, we felt it was time to work on our documentation site’s design, too.

Documentation on how to use MyGet

The front page looks completely different. We decided to put a search engine central, as well as some popular articles that can help you get started.

One of the things we want to encourage everyone to do is comment on documentation: explain how you did something, ask questions and get help. If we see there are some things that are not completely clear from these comments, we’ll work on additional documentation there. Therefore, every article now gets a section where you can add your comments.

Add comments to MyGet documentation

Not that we are lazy, but if you feel you can do a better job at an article, spot a typo or want to add something, every article features a direct link to our GitHub repository where you can send us a pull request with changes. And that’s not work you’re doing for free: for every accepted Pull Request, you get a free one month extension of your current subscription.

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Happy packaging!