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Configuring password policies and account lockout using MyGet Enterprise

MyGet Enterprise contains everything MyGet has to offer, hosted on a dedicated URL for your team. It comes with an additional management dashboard that can be used to manage everything related to the team such as feeds, users, quota, account policies and so forth. We recently made some additions to this mangement dashboard that make managing a MyGet Enterprise account even more powerful.

Managing account policies for MyGet EnterpriseWhen navigating to the management dashboard as an administrator, you will be greeted by a new menu entry: Account. This section allows access to management of:

  • Password requirements, such as
    • Minimum password length
    • Required lowercase characters
    • Required uppercase characters
    • Required numeric characters
    • Required special characters
  • Lockout policy
    • How many invalid login attempts are allowed? In what timeframe?
    • How long should accounts be locked out?
  • Session
    • After how much idle time should users be logged off?

We also added the ability to unlock users from the Users section. This way you can also manually unlock users within your team if required.

Speaking of the Users section… Many teams wanted to have the ability to have an administrator create users insted of waiting for users to register their own account. Users can now be created by clicking the Add a new user button, after which the display name, user name, password and e-mail can be entered. Optionally, a welcome e-mail can be sent to the user as well.

Full documentation on the MyGet Enterprise management dashboard is available as well.

Happy packaging!

Using MyGet as a OneGet package source

At the Build conference, Microsoft announced the Windows Management Framework 5.0 Preview which includes Windows PowerShell 5.0, updates to the PowerShell ISE, Network Switch Cmdlets and ... OneGet!

What is OneGet?

OneGet a unified package management interface component with a set of managed and native APIs, a set of PowerShell cmdlets, and a WMI provider. The component accepts both Microsoft-provided and 3rd party-provided plugins which extend the functionality for a given package type.

The OneGet team also has a weekly community meeting of which you can see the first introductionary recording below.

As part of this Preview, OneGet is shipping with a prototype plugin compatible with Chocolatey, the so called ChocolateyProvider. This is a prototype implementation of a Chocolatey-compatible package manager that can install existing Chocolatey packages. This is a clear confirmation for the hard work done by the Chocolatey folks, and both systems will continue to evolve together, as Rob Reynolds explains in this post. If you want to follow-up on OneGet, then check out its GitHub repository and follow PSOneGet on Twitter.

Something about a forest and trees...

NuGet, MyGet, Chocolatey, OneGet... what?! People ask questions and occasionally can't see the forest for the trees. Here's a quick recap:

  • NuGet: a solution-level package management tool, used to manage software dependencies within the scope of a solution. It is accompanied by the NuGet Gallery, the home of many if not all .NET open source components.
  • Chocolatey: a system-level package management tool, used to manage software installations on a Windows system. It (currently) leverages PowerShell and NuGet, supports the Web Platform Installer (WebPI), MSI, RubyGems and many more, and is accompanied by the Chocolatey Gallery where you can find many popular software packages. Rob describes Chocolatey as somewhat like "apt-get", but with Windows in mind.
  • MyGet: a hosted NuGet package server where you can create and secure your own feeds. In essence, MyGet is able to host vanilla NuGet feeds, as well as Chocolatey feeds.
  • OneGet: a a unified interface to package management systems (see above)

So what does this mean? How do these package managers play along?

OneGet supports multiple package sources, and as stated earlier, OneGet comes with a ChocolateyProvider. As MyGet also supports Chocolatey feeds, this effectively means that you can register a MyGet feed as a Chocolatey package source in OneGet! The blow diagram is an attempt to illustrate how they relate:

How do OneGet, Chocolatey, NuGet and MyGet play along?

OneGet supports several commands at this stage:

OneGet Preview cmdlets

How can I use a private OneGet package source?

So how can I register a private OneGet package source? Well, let's first see how you can register any package source using the Add-PackageSource cmdlet. Here's what the built-in help currently says:

OneGet Add-PackageSource Help

Note that this is a Preview: help is incomplete and cmdlets might change name, but this should already give you a good idea of what you can do with this cmdlet!

Now, let's register a MyGet feed on which you can host Chocolatey packages:

Register a MyGet feed as a OneGet package source

Did you notice how OneGet asked you to install the NuGet package manager?

That went easy right? That's because that feed was public :) OneGet does not support basic-authentication at this point, nor does it leverage any nuget.config settings you might configure (tried it). However, MyGet just added the possibility to use a "private-by-obscurity" endpoint on private feeds, which should allow you to use private feeds as well. Note: we don't actively promote this, as it requires you to share one of your feed's access tokens. This is a work-around for clients that don't support the basic-auth flow, and we'd prefer to have proper basic-authentication support in OneGet, so fingers crossed!

You can verify the correct registration of your OneGet package source using the following commands:

Get OneGet package sources List available packages on a OneGet package source

Installing a software package from this MyGet feed is straightforward as well:

Install a software package from a specific OneGet feed

This flow allows you to control what packages get distributed through OneGet, avoids the need to publish your internal software to the general public, and still allows you to leverage the great new scenarios that OneGet offers!

As usual, happy packaging! :)

Receive feed activity notifications through RSS

Ever wanted to get notified when a new package is available on your feed? Did you know you can just browse the Packages collection on any NuGet feed?


Obviously, that also works on MyGet feeds, but did you know that ever since we launched MyGet, we had this little RSS endpoint sitting around?


In it's early state it was just exposing your feed's OData Packages collection. However, as we introduced activity logs and started collecting this data to show up in activity streams on the web site, we can now also provide you with a more useful RSS feed.

Wouldn't it be useful if we just gave you your activitylog through RSS? Let's see what it looks like in it's current form:

We think this is pretty useful. This is only a minimum-viable notification system in our opinion and we'd love to get feedback on how we can improve this further to match your needs. So please, don't hesitate to reach out and let your voice be heard! One address: http://myget.uservoice.com.

Besides simply subscribing to the RSS feed, you might want to make the internet work for you.

Our friends at MessageHandler have built something that hooks into our activity streams, allowing you to configure a handler that sends you an email and creates a GitHub issue when a MyGet build fails.

For those using IFTTT (if-this-then-that), we've also created a few recipes (or you can build your own):

Happy Packaging!

NuGet Dependency Management with Drone Delivery

Using MyGet just became easier. We are proud to announce a new feature (in preview) which brings a better and bolder way of consuming NuGet packages from your feed! Next to using Visual Studio or the NuGet command line tool to have packages delivered to your project, it is now possible to have packages delivered by drones using the new Drone Delivery feature.

Many established companies, as well as startups, are experimenting with drones for their services. MyGet will be the first to offer dependency management using this approach. And for good reasons: the Drone Delivery feature will make package restore a breeze even if you lose your Internet connection.

Here’s an overview of how Drone Delivery works:

How drone delivery works

The new Drone Delivery feature will surface in many places throughout the MyGet website, for example on package details pages and in the MyGet Gallery. It is also possible to consume all packages from a feed using Drone Delivery:

Drone Delivery of an entire feed

We're really excited about this feature and will be adding additional capabilities in the future. We are thinking about Google Glass apps and Oculus VR support to enable tracking package delivery in real time.

More information on this new feature can be found in our documentation. If you want the preview of Drone Delivery enabled for your account, let us know.

Happy packaging!