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MyGet's NuGet and NPM news from the community

Many are returning from summer vacation, others have been enjoying the tranquility of summer holiday. Whichever side you’re on, we at MyGet have been watching the NuGet and NPM community news in the past few weeks. In this post, we bring you some interesting blog posts and articles, curated by our MyGet founders Xavier and Maarten. Follow @MyGetTeam on Twitter for more!

NuGet news

NuGet news, curated by MyGetOn the NuGet blog, the NuGet client 3.5 RC has been announced, with support for new target frameworks and lots of performance improvements. Additionally, the NuGet team started working on better documentation, now available as a preview on http://docspreview.nuget.org.

More from the NuGet team: they made some changes to the expiring API keys policy. At MyGet we’ve always made this opt-in, and the NuGet.org gallery will now do the same.

New to NuGet? Rohit Chopra has you covered with his article “NuGet – A Powerful way to share your code”. While focused on NuGet, it’s a nice summary of why you want to use a package manager in your projects. Xiao Ling has a step-by-step post on creating and publishing .NET Core packages.

Building things in Unity? Wondering what NuGet is? Ashley Davis has you covered with his introduction to using Unity and NuGet. The Unity solution templates don’t easily allow working with NuGet, but there are some easy workarounds. A good example is demonstrated, installing JSON.NET into a Unity project.

Have you been consuming NuGet, and just started looking into creating your own NuGet packages to share them with team mates or with the world? Learn about publishing your first .NET Core NuGet package with AppVeyor and MyGet  - Andrew Lock gives a good step-by-step tutorial on what you need in code, and how AppVeyor and MyGet can be used to build and distribute your code.

On a similar topic, Maarten Balliauw has a post on Building NuGet (.NET Core) using Atlassian Bitbucket Pipelines. Pipelines is Atalassian’s continuous integration service that runs on Docker and Linux. And since .NET Core is a first class citizen on that platform, why not use it to build and test NuGet packages?

NPM news

NPM news, curated by MyGetLet’s start on the tooling side. Node has gotten two new releases, 4.5.0 and 6.4.0. Mostly bugfixes, better profiling support and improvements in objects and function contexts for debuggers. On the npm side, there’s now 2.15.10 and 3.10.7, with improvements to how scoped dependencies are handled and several other bugfixes.

Did you know the two millionth package version was just published to npm? If you have as well, congratulations! This is a pretty epic milestone in the Node.js community.

Laurie Voss, COO at npm, has a great talk titled “Abstractions, npm past, present, future”. It covers what is npm and where it came from, where the ecosystem stands today and what the plans are for the future. Highly recommended!

New to node? Have a look at Node Hero’s blog post series! These thirteen articles cover everything from getting started with node and npm, to building a web app, security, monitoring and all other aspects of building a node application.

Npmjs.org added web hook support a while back. Julian Gruber did a proof-of-concept where updated dependencies are automatically deployed in the application. Not the best idea, given that your deployment may break because of an updated dependency, but still quite cool. Package update? Deploy!

Into the Internet of Things? One such thing is the International Space Station! Dave Johnson has a nice post Node.js IoT: Tracking the ISS through the Sky where he uses JavaScript to capture GPS coordinates from the IIS and compares it to your home location to create a real-time tracker.

We’re thinking about doing this type of post each month. Let us know if you’d like that or not, using the comments below or reach out on Twitter.

Happy packaging!

Deprecation notice: SymbolSource integration will end on November 1, 2016

On November 1, 2016, MyGet will end integration with SymbolSource.org, making our built-in symbol server the only option for symbols hosting with MyGet.

When working with NuGet feeds, symbols packages can be pushed so that consumers of the package can step through the source code and integrate with Visual Studio and tools like WinDbg. MyGet has always offered two options for handling symbols packages: using our built-in symbol server or using SymbolSource.org.

With the advent of .NET Core and native debugging on platforms like Linux and Mac OS X, we’re working closely with Microsoft on providing the best symbols-based debugging experience, an experience which we can only guarantee when using our built-in symbol server.

Please update your Visual Studio configuration and/or continuous integration servers by November 1, 2016 to make use of MyGet’s symbol server. Your feed’s “Feed Details” tab provides the correct URL’s for pushing and consuming symbols packages.

Note that the SymbolSource.org URL can still be used for consuming existing symbols packages after November 1, 2016. Account synchronization from MyGet with SymbolSource.org will end. We recommend updating your systems to make use of MyGet's built-in symbol server to ensure continuity of working with symbols packages after November 1, 2016.

Happy packaging!

Keeping feeds clean with retention rules

MyGet Package Retention Rules help clean up your NuGet npm feedMany developer teams use MyGet for storing their continuous integration and/or nightly builds of NuGet, npm, Bower and VSIX packages. As more and more packages get added, it may become harder to manage them all. Some packages may be used in projects, while others are not. Let’s go over the options available for housekeeping.

By default, MyGet keeps all package versions available on our feeds. Every package pushed is there forever, unless manually removed or removed by package retention. By setting retention rules, it is possible to automatically trim the list of packages to X latest packages, keeping into account package usage in projects and package dependency trees.

Configuring retention rules

Retention rules are defined per feed. Some feeds may have more aggressive retention rules defined, other may not have them enabled at all. From the Retention Rules, we can define:

  • the maximum number of stable versions to keep
  • the maximum number of prerelease versions to keep
  • whether to keep depended packages or not – enabling this makes sure package restores always complete successfully by keeping the dependency tree in its entirety
  • whether to allow removal of packages that have downloads – enabling this option ensures that packages that are being used in projects never get deleted

Setting retention rules

Keeping a specific package around

Retention rules are quite brute-force: they will always remove all packages that match the configured rules. Luckily, MyGet lets us “pin” packages which we want to keep around. For example, we may want to only keep the latest 10 pre-release versions while still keeping around the 20th pre-release version we’re still using in our projects.

From the package details page, we can define which package versions should never be considered by retention rules by using the Pin button next to the package.

Pinning packages so they do not get removed

We can pin package per version, or all versions at once using the button at the top of the Package History list. Of course, we can also Unpin packages using the same approach. Once a package is unpinned, retention rules are allowed to remove them.

Custom retention rules using web hooks

Using the built-in retention rules may not be enough. For example, what if we want to run retention rules based on other conditions than the latest version? What if we want to only remove packages when there is a full moon? Using web hooks, we can subscribe to certain feed events (like “package added”) and run our custom logic to optionally remove packages from our feed. We have a complete example available that helps getting started with web hooks.

Learn more about package retention in our documentation.

Happy packaging!

Improved build log viewer with error navigation

We have just deployed a newer version of our build log viewer. When using MyGet’s build services to compile and package NuGet, npm or VSIX packages, the build log viewer now has colored output as well as line numbers that have hyperlinks. Want to share a certain line in the build log with a colleague? Click the line number and send the link so they can open the build log right where you left.

By making less important build output less prominent and by highlighting more important messages, reading and analyzing the build log becomes much easier: less important messages have a gray color tone, normal messages are white. Warnings and errors are highlighted in yellow and red, making them much easier to spot.

Build log with colored output

When warnings or errors are found in a build log, MyGet now shows additional navigation buttons at the top. Next to the number of warnings or errors, the up and down arrows can be clicked to jump to the next important message in your build log.

Warning and error navigation

We’re looking forward to hearing your thoughts on this improvement. Let us know through the comments below or drop us a note via e-mail or Twitter.

Happy packaging!