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MyGet's NuGet and NPM news from the community (March 2017)

Here's a fresh episode of MyGet's NuGet and NPM news from the community! Like each month, we'll look at some interesting blog posts and articles found on the Internet, curated by our MyGet founders Xavier and Maarten. Follow @MyGetTeam on Twitter for more!

NuGet news

Let's start with the big one: Visual Studio 2017 has been released. A new IDE with a revamped project system (bye project.json), .NET Core tooling and more. Oh, and a fresh NuGet.exe 4.0.

Sean Feldman shares a great blog post about leveraging MyGet web hooks and Azure Functions for sending out notifications.

In VSIX Continuous Delivery using Cake, AppVeyor and MyGet (do make sure to read the entire series), Alistair Chapman covers setting up a CI/CD pipeline using best-of-breed tools.

Steve Desmond released a new tool called LibYear. It is an addon to dotnet.exe  and scans a project for outdated package references. It also features an update  command to update all referenced dependencies in one go.

NuGet Package Explorer is now a Windows Store application.

Just like ReSharper has been doing since forever, Visual Studio 2017 now suggests installing NuGet packages for missing types.

The .NET Core folks started an announcement repository to which you can subscribe to be notified of announcements and changes in .NET Core.

Matt Warren wrote a post with pointers to the .NET Core internals source code. Great list of resources if you want to dive deep into the new .NET.

Ivan Gavryliuk posted NuGet Versioning Hell. Not a rant, but a post on the importance of proper versioning.

NPM news

In the 4.3 branch, NPM released v4.3.3. A fresh NPM version v4.4.1 has landed! Nothing special though, just making sure all NodeJS versions are supported. There is also v4.4.2, bringing along a number of bugfixes. And v4.4.3. And v4.4.4. Or maybe just install the latest v4.5.0.

NPM has an RFC open related to file type dependency specifiers. It makes depending on files inside of our package.json 's dependencies easier. It can point to a package on disk, either compressed or extracted.

Nihar Sawant wrote a post on developing an interactive command line application using Node.He uses the commander  package to build a sample application, which is pretty nifty and handles the async and promises nature of Node in an easy to read manner.

Happy packaging!

Visual Studio 2017 and .NET Core support on MyGet

With MyGet build services, we can link a GitHub or BitBucket repository to MyGet and create packages automatically. Today, we're happy to release support for the new project format that was introduced with Visual Studio 2017 last week. With this support also came the latest SDK's, F# 4.1 support, a new NPM version and many more enhancements to our build services.

Building .NET Core NuGet pacages

Ever since the first release of "project K", we have supported building what became .NET Core projects. Some scripting was required to build a NuGet package from a project.json file though. With the introduction of Visual Studio 2017 and NuGet 4.0, building NuGet packages for .NET Core projects has become very easy.

NuGet has become a part of the MSBuild pipeline, which means just building a project with the correct flags enabled will result in a NuGet package being created. Let's see how

From any .NET Core project (in the new .csproj format)'s settings, we can navigate to the Package tab and enable Generate NuGet package on build. That's... it! We can add some package metadata, publish our source code to GitHub, and have MyGet build it for us.


By default, no debugger symbols package will be generated that can help consumers of our NuGet package to step into our source code. It's simple enough to enable this feature though. From the solution explorer, use the Edit ProjectName.csproj context menu and add two MSBuild properties: IncludeSymbols and IncludeSource.

<Project SDK="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">

  <PropertyGroup>
<TargetFramework>netcoreapp1.0</TargetFramework>
<Authors>Maarten Balliauw</Authors>
<Company>MyGet</Company>
<Description>Hello World for .NET Core.</Description> <Copyright>Maarten Balliauw</Copyright> <PackageTags>hello world core</PackageTags>
<GeneratePackageOnBuild>True</GeneratePackageOnBuild>
<IncludeSymbols>True</IncludeSymbols>
<IncludeSource>True</IncludeSource>

</PropertyGroup> </Project
>

Commit, push, and let MyGet handle the build and serve up debugger symbols.

Happy packaging! (and building)