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Using MyGet as a OneGet package source

At the Build conference, Microsoft announced the Windows Management Framework 5.0 Preview which includes Windows PowerShell 5.0, updates to the PowerShell ISE, Network Switch Cmdlets and ... OneGet!

What is OneGet?

OneGet a unified package management interface component with a set of managed and native APIs, a set of PowerShell cmdlets, and a WMI provider. The component accepts both Microsoft-provided and 3rd party-provided plugins which extend the functionality for a given package type.

The OneGet team also has a weekly community meeting of which you can see the first introductionary recording below.

As part of this Preview, OneGet is shipping with a prototype plugin compatible with Chocolatey, the so called ChocolateyProvider. This is a prototype implementation of a Chocolatey-compatible package manager that can install existing Chocolatey packages. This is a clear confirmation for the hard work done by the Chocolatey folks, and both systems will continue to evolve together, as Rob Reynolds explains in this post. If you want to follow-up on OneGet, then check out its GitHub repository and follow PSOneGet on Twitter.

Something about a forest and trees...

NuGet, MyGet, Chocolatey, OneGet... what?! People ask questions and occasionally can't see the forest for the trees. Here's a quick recap:

  • NuGet: a solution-level package management tool, used to manage software dependencies within the scope of a solution. It is accompanied by the NuGet Gallery, the home of many if not all .NET open source components.
  • Chocolatey: a system-level package management tool, used to manage software installations on a Windows system. It (currently) leverages PowerShell and NuGet, supports the Web Platform Installer (WebPI), MSI, RubyGems and many more, and is accompanied by the Chocolatey Gallery where you can find many popular software packages. Rob describes Chocolatey as somewhat like "apt-get", but with Windows in mind.
  • MyGet: a hosted NuGet package server where you can create and secure your own feeds. In essence, MyGet is able to host vanilla NuGet feeds, as well as Chocolatey feeds.
  • OneGet: a a unified interface to package management systems (see above)

So what does this mean? How do these package managers play along?

OneGet supports multiple package sources, and as stated earlier, OneGet comes with a ChocolateyProvider. As MyGet also supports Chocolatey feeds, this effectively means that you can register a MyGet feed as a Chocolatey package source in OneGet! The blow diagram is an attempt to illustrate how they relate:

How do OneGet, Chocolatey, NuGet and MyGet play along?

OneGet supports several commands at this stage:

OneGet Preview cmdlets

How can I use a private OneGet package source?

So how can I register a private OneGet package source? Well, let's first see how you can register any package source using the Add-PackageSource cmdlet. Here's what the built-in help currently says:

OneGet Add-PackageSource Help

Note that this is a Preview: help is incomplete and cmdlets might change name, but this should already give you a good idea of what you can do with this cmdlet!

Now, let's register a MyGet feed on which you can host Chocolatey packages:

Register a MyGet feed as a OneGet package source

Did you notice how OneGet asked you to install the NuGet package manager?

That went easy right? That's because that feed was public :) OneGet does not support basic-authentication at this point, nor does it leverage any nuget.config settings you might configure (tried it). However, MyGet just added the possibility to use a "private-by-obscurity" endpoint on private feeds, which should allow you to use private feeds as well. Note: we don't actively promote this, as it requires you to share one of your feed's access tokens. This is a work-around for clients that don't support the basic-auth flow, and we'd prefer to have proper basic-authentication support in OneGet, so fingers crossed!

You can verify the correct registration of your OneGet package source using the following commands:

Get OneGet package sources List available packages on a OneGet package source

Installing a software package from this MyGet feed is straightforward as well:

Install a software package from a specific OneGet feed

This flow allows you to control what packages get distributed through OneGet, avoids the need to publish your internal software to the general public, and still allows you to leverage the great new scenarios that OneGet offers!

As usual, happy packaging! :)

Receive feed activity notifications through RSS

Ever wanted to get notified when a new package is available on your feed? Did you know you can just browse the Packages collection on any NuGet feed?


Obviously, that also works on MyGet feeds, but did you know that ever since we launched MyGet, we had this little RSS endpoint sitting around?


In it's early state it was just exposing your feed's OData Packages collection. However, as we introduced activity logs and started collecting this data to show up in activity streams on the web site, we can now also provide you with a more useful RSS feed.

Wouldn't it be useful if we just gave you your activitylog through RSS? Let's see what it looks like in it's current form:

We think this is pretty useful. This is only a minimum-viable notification system in our opinion and we'd love to get feedback on how we can improve this further to match your needs. So please, don't hesitate to reach out and let your voice be heard! One address: http://myget.uservoice.com.

Besides simply subscribing to the RSS feed, you might want to make the internet work for you.

Our friends at MessageHandler have built something that hooks into our activity streams, allowing you to configure a handler that sends you an email and creates a GitHub issue when a MyGet build fails.

For those using IFTTT (if-this-then-that), we've also created a few recipes (or you can build your own):

Happy Packaging!

Checking NuGet package vulnerabilities with OWASP SafeNuGet

Edit - October 14, 2016 - We have a new, integrated vulnerability scan service.

A couple of days ago, OWASP released a new NuGet package which is able to check known vulnerabilities in NuGet packages. Use of libraries with known vulnerabilities can be an issue for software and components you create: check the excellent whitepaper "The Unfortunate Reality of Insecure Libraries". In the OWASP Top 10 2013, consuming vulnerable packages is listed under A9 Using Known Vulnerable Components.

There is a simple solution to this: by installing one additional package in your projects, automatic checking for known vulnerabilities can be done. The SafeNuGet package contains an MSBuild task which will warn you about this.

A repository with vulnerable packages and the reason for that can be found on the SafeNuGet GitHub project. When running a build which references vulnerable NuGet packages, the warnings list will contain some information about this as well as a link with some explanation:

Checking package vulnerabilities

And of course when such library is built using MyGet Build Services, a warning will also be displayed in the build log:

MyGet build services security scan

It would be great if the build would fail entirely when such package is found, right? Well, that is a simple configuration parameter for the SafeNuGet package. Find the SafeNuGet.targets file and update its contents to:

<Project ToolsVersion="4.0" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003">
  <UsingTask AssemblyFile="SafeNuGet.dll" TaskName="SafeNuGet.AreNuGetPackagesSafe"  />
  <Target Name="AfterBuild">
    <AreNuGetPackagesSafe ProjectPath="$(MSBuildProjectDirectory)"
         CacheTimeInMinutes="10" DontBreakBuild="false" />
  </Target>
</Project>

Want to make sure known vulnerabilities are shown in your builds? You know the drill:

SafeNuGet

Happy and safe packaging!

Specifying which projects get built with MyGet Build Services

Using MyGet Build Services, you have the opportunity to control exactly how your project gets built. By default, several conventions are used to run builds. MyGet will scan the contents of your Source Control Repository looking for a file which it can work with. In order of precedence, the following files are searched for:

  • Project files (*.csproj, *.vbproj, ...) specified in the build source configuration.
  • MyGet.bat, MyGet.cmd or MyGet.ps1
  • build.bat, build.cmd or build.ps1
  • MyGet.sln
  • Any other *.sln file
  • *.csproj (and *.vbproj, etc)
  • *.nuspec

With the latest deployment of MyGet Build Services, it is now possible to specify which project(s) to build, per build source configuration.

MyGet Specify Project to Build

The projects to build can be C# or VB.NET projects or solutions. Based on the files found, the build process will be slightly different. See the documentation on MyGet Build Services for more information.

Happy packaging!

Migrate away from MSBuild-based NuGet package restore

Back in the days...

NuGet package restore used to be MSBuild-based. You had to explicitly enable it using the context menu on a Visual Studio solution: right-click the solution and select Enable NuGet Package Restore. In fact, if you go to the NuGet docs, you'll see that this scenario is still fully documented. A quick search for "package restore" will throw this old scenario "in your face", as it is the first hit in the search results.

First hit in search results when looking for Package Restore on the NuGet docs

To be fair, the page does highlight that there's a new way of doing this. But many people don't read. At best some look at the pictures. That's why I won't even include a screenshot of that page, as it is full of project setup details that no one should ever go through again. Instead, I'll give you a clear picture of what you should not do :)

Don't do this!

You're doing it wrong!

I can't stress it enough. I'm a huge proponent of NuGet package restore! But if you follow this workflow, then please do it right! (and design for failure, obviously).

The MSBuild-based NuGet package restore has issues. For one: it's MSBuild-based. This means that anything that happens during package restore is run within the MSBuild process, which is particularly annoying for packages that want to modify project files and inject MSBuild targets (as these aren't picked up until the next run).

The moment you manually enable NuGet package restore through the context menu, you're actually installing a few NuGet packages: NuGet.Build, which depends on NuGet.Commandline. The nuget.exe along with a nuget.config and a nuget.targets file are created within a .nuget folder, and all projects that have NuGet package references will be modified to import the NuGet.targets file. The nuget.targets file ensures that nuget.exe is invoked during builds (as in: not before builds!).

The right way

All you need to do is to make sure that your Visual Studio options allow NuGet to download any missing packages in a pre-build phase (note: even before MSBuild compilation starts!). I'm not going to rephrase step-by-step what you should do as David Ebbo already has a great post explaining all of this!

Ensure NuGet is allowed to download missing packages

If you're cloning a new project that did not commit any NuGet packages (and is not using the old MSBuild-based restore), then it just works!

Migrating from the old way

If you still have a .nuget folder in your repository, then please migrate away from it! Think about all those adorable kittens...

Did you know this has been documented on the NuGet Docs all along?! Follow this how-to and save yourself and everyone using your codebase some trouble and follow it step-by-step.

But... my precious (build server)

Here you go: set this environment variable to true and be done with it.

EnableNuGetPackageRestore=true

The following tools support the new automatic package restore out-of-the-box and Just Work™!

The next list of tools requires some minor modifications to the build process:

  • Visual Studio Online / Team Foundation Server (how-to)
  • TeamCity (how-to)

Note that you don't need to worry about development machines! As long as you all have the latest NuGet Visual Studio extension installed.

Upgrading your NuGet extension is generally a good idea anyway, as there are lots of improvements in the latest versions!

Going forward

Here's what I'd love to see happen going forward:

  • The NuGet Docs should by default show the new non-MSBuild-based package restore instructions. There are close to none, but this should be thrown in your face when looking for it.
  • Migration instructions should be clearly linked to.
  • The old MSBuild-based instructions should be archived, perhaps even removed.
  • The context menu-item to manually enable NuGet package restore (MSBuild-based) should be completely removed from the extension. I don't see any reason to keep it. Do you? If you do, please comment on this CodePlex issue, if you agree, then vote for it :)
  • Preferably, the next NuGet Visual Studio extension detects you are using the "old" restore option when you open a solution, and asks you to migrate/upgrade to the new way. Ideally, this removes the targets and import statements, and custom package sources and credentials are taken into account if they are in the nuget.config file.

I'm happy to take on an issue or send PR's for any of the above, but some of the bullet-points seem too big to me to be taken in as a PR.

Which packages are added to a feed during build?

With MyGet Build Services, it is very easy to create NuGet packages from source control. Link a GitHub, BitBucket or CodePlex project to your MyGet feed and we’ll take care of building it and publishing generated packages to that feed. But which packages are added to your feed?

By default, MyGet will add all NuGet packages generated during build to your feed, as long as they are created in a folder named other than packages. The reason for this is that the packages folder is reserved by NuGet itself and may contain packages that were used during the build process and are not necessarily to be added to your feed. When creating a batch-based build, make sure to generate packages in a folder not named packages. A good example folder name could be output.

How to be selective about this? Is it possible to specify which packages are added to your feed? Well yes! To override the default behaviour, a series of wildcard matches can be specified in the build source configuration. When omitted, all packages generated during build will be pushed to your feed. When specified, only packages matching any of the specified package names or wildcards will be pushed to your feed.

image

In the above example, all package names matching Google*.nupkg or Newtonsoft* will be added to your feed.

Happy packaging!

We Love Our Customers!

Whether you are into Valentine's Day or not, we love you! That's why we are offering a 50% discount to all new subscriptions (Starter, Professional) as well as to all subscription renewals (Starter, Professional) purchased on Valentine's Day and the whole weekend after! 

We want you to spend time with the ones you love and care about, and not worry about missing this limited offer. As we are offering our services worldwide, we also don't want to annoy anyone with timezone differences. 

That's why this offer is valid from Friday February 14th (UTC-12) until Sunday February 16th (UTC+12). No matter what timezone you're in, you have the whole 4 days :-)

Checkout the subscription plans and share the love!

Happy packaging!

Default feed endpoint issues 7 February 2013 - Post mortem

On February 7, 2013, we've experienced a partial downtime. The default endpoint for consuming NuGet feeds was slow to respond (+/- 2 minutes for a simple request) and caused issues with a lot of our users and their development teams and processes. We share your pain: we use MyGet for developing MyGet and we hate when things like this happen as much as you do. Our sincerest apologies for the inconvenience caused!

In this post, we'll have a look at what happened and the reason this happened. But before we dive in: we've had 3 hours of partial downtime on the default feed endpoint which most users have configured. We want to apologize by extending all paid subscriptions (Starter, Professional and Enterprise) with one additional month. No action is required on your end, your subscription has already been extended.

What happened?

At around 3:15 PM (CET), our monitoring alerted us about latency on the default feed endpoint going up. After a quick investigation and some additional time, latency went back to normal. One hour later, around 4:15 PM (CET), we saw the same happening again, as well as a number of support e-mails coming in.

MyGet has the following feed endpoints available (see documentation):

  • /F/<your_feed_name> - the NuGet v2 API endpoint
  • /F/<your_feed_name>/api/v2 - the NuGet v2 API endpoint for consuming packages
  • /F/<your_feed_name>/api/v2/package - the NuGet v2 API endpoint for pushing packages
  • /F/<your_feed_name>/api/v1 - the NuGet v1 API endpoint for consuming and pushing packages (still in use by Orchard CMS and some others)

In this case, the default endpoint we offer our users was experiencing issues, the other endpoints were not. We decided to reply all support requests with the advice to switch to the v2 feed endpoint to make sure you could continue work. This requires some reconfiguration, but we figured it's better than having very slow access and timeouts connecting to your feeds.

We checked logs, diagnostics, monitoring reports, read and re-read our code, but could not pinpoint any reason for the default feed endpoint having such high latency. At 5:00 PM (CET) we decided to fail-over to our secondary datacenter. Being a separate environment, we wanted to see if the issue would haoppen there as well. It didn't! So we flipped the DR switch and took our primary datacenter out of the loop to be able to investigate the servers without causing additional issues for our users. This fail-over solved the issue for most of our users, who were able to work with MyGet's default feed endpoint from around 6:00 PM (CET), mind some DNS propagation for some users.

Digging through more logs, we discovered the issue that caused the default feed endpoint to experience this latency (we'll elaborate in a minute). At 8:00 PM (CET), we rolled out a hotfix to our secondary datacenter to make sure the issue would not resurface there either. We worked on a final fix for the next few hours and at 11:30 PM (CET), we flipped the switch back to our primary datacenter.

Why was the default feed endpoint so slow?

As you know, MyGet supports adding upstream feeds and allows to proxy them. This is a very useful feature as one feed can essentially bundle several others, so a developer team only has to configure one and still get packages from multiple.

MyGet treats all upstream package sources as external feeds, even if an upstream feed is a MyGet feed. The reason for that is security contexts can be diferent and we want to have all security aspects applied at any time. This does mean that a MyGet feed having an upstream MyGet feed as a package source is effectively using the default feed endpoint of this second feed, going oer our internal network through the load balancer. Next to security, this also allows us to fan out queries going to multiple package sources over multiple machines.

One of our users configured upstream package sources that were referencing themselves: feed A referencing feed B referencing feed A. We prohibit self-referencing feeds, but the scenario this user tried to achieve was unsupported and resulted in a reference loop on the default feed endpoint. The default feed endpoint was bringing itself down by fanning out queries to itself.

Previous incidents teached us to partition as many things as possible, and luckily we partition all alternative feed endpoints. This allowed us to direct support requests towards the other feed endpoints so users could keep using our service.

Solution

As a quick fix, we disabled the faulting package source so our service could be resumed in a stable fashion. Once that was done, we worked on a permanent solution to this issue. Do we want to block self-referencing feeds? Absolutely, as that makes no sense. Do we want to block adding other MyGet feeds as upstream package sources? No.

We want to keep supporting having upstream package sources that can be MyGet feeds, so that complex hierarchies of feeds and privileges can be configured. Quite a number of feeds do this today, having one feed proxying a series of upstream feeds.

How do we prevent the same problem from happening again? We are now actively tracking refering feeds and detecting loops in these references. Doing this, we keep supporting all scenarios that were possible before while protecting ourselves from shooting ourselves in the foot. Feed A can reference feed B, which can reference feed A. Users can make use of feed A as the entry pont, as well as feed B, and get all expected packages on the feed. We will make sure reference loops are removed from the feed hierarchy.

When a MyGet feed references a non-MyGet feed, we will also be adding an HTTP header to all upstream requests, X-NuGet-Feedchain, which contains the full list of refering feeds. Other NuGet feed implementations can make use of this header to detect reference loops on their end as well.

While we replied to all support requests in under 5 minutes with a workaround to use one of the other endpoints, we will be working on extending our status page at http://status.myget.org, showing details about all endpoints. We also want to be able to post status messages and tips & tricks like switching to the secondary feed endpoints on there.

Hardware fails, software has bugs and people make mistakes. We strive to mitigate as many of these factors and maintain a high quality service with fast, good support. We'll keep doing that to provide you with the best experience possible.

Again, we do apologize for the inconvenience caused.

Happy packaging!

A very useful MyGet PowerShell suite

We recently shed a light on how you can easily use additional build tools on MyGet Build Services. However, there is more. A lot more!

We always say how much we love our users and this blog post is yet another illustration why we do. One of our users, Peter Rekdal Sunde, created an awesome PowerShell utility pack to make it even easier to customize your MyGet Build Services experience. The result is a complete build suite for creating NuGet packages and interacting with the MyGet Build Services environment. The scripts not only work on MyGet but also on your local development computer (you do need to have msysgit installed though). The entire code base was generously opensourced (MIT license) and is available on GitHub: https://github.com/peters/myget.

How does it work?

Simply include the myget.include.ps1 script in your build.ps1 on MyGet and use the provided functions.

Where do I begin?

To illustrate its purpose, we provide you a glimpse at some of the functionality provided by these scripts:

Build agent communication

  • MyGet-Write-Diagnostic - writes a diagnostic message to the standard output
  • MyGet-Build-Success - report build success
  • MyGet-Die - report build failure

NuGet utility functions

  • MyGet-NuGetExe-Path - path to NuGet.exe
  • MyGet-NuGet-Get-PackagesPath - returns the value of the repositoryPath attribute in nuget.config for a given project folder

Build steps

  • MyGet-Build-Bootstrap - starts a build (including NuGet package restore)
  • MyGet-Build-Solution - starts a build of a solution file
  • MyGet-Build-Project - starts a build of a project file
  • MyGet-Build-Nupkg - creates a NuGet package based on a specified .nuspec file. The .nuspec can contain additional replacement tokens, taking benefit from some of the variables provided by default by MyGet Build Services. More information at https://github.com/peters/myget#nuspec-substitutions.

Test runners

  • MyGet-TestRunner-Nunit - invoke NUnit
  • MyGet-TestRunner-Xunit - invoke XUnit

We recommend you to check out the readme and the samples for a detailed view of what's available though. Especially the test runner support is really nice, just check the below example!

Thank you Peter!

Happy packaging!

MyGet Year in Review 2013

2013 was a good year. We had tons of fun developing MyGet and judging from the feedback we get from you we can tell you are having fun with MyGet as well. And that is awesome! Thank you so much for sharing your feedback and your continued support!

Speaking of feedback: what do you think our 2014 roadmap should look like? Let us know through this survey!

Looking back at 2013 also involves some numbers, so here goes:

  • Average response time went from 3 081 ms back in January to 538 ms in December. That's almost a factor 6 improvement! Now let's scale those improvements to various other components of MyGet.
  • Average uptime in 2013 was 99.83%. We had 6 out of 12 months with 100% uptime. That's not too bad knowing that we combine various components with a 99.99% service availability each. Full history can be found on our status page.
  • Despite a 5min glitch on October 10, we have to go back to September 12 to find our last service issue caused by a circular package dependency, which in turn caused our package retention rules engine to choke on it. Measures have been taken to prevent this from happening on MyGet and a full root cause analysis is available on our blog.
  • We are now hosting 2394 feeds (excluding the Enterprise plan feeds), good for 85.000 unique packages and 40 GB of storage (plus 3 months worth of backups, that's 600 GB in total). Bandwidth is currently just below 1 TB a month.
  • Build services has ran 4.800 builds this year, and we're seeing quite some growth there over the last months.

Even though we deploy continuously, we tagged the following releases in 2013:

  • MyGet 1.5 (January 5th): new profile page, activity streams, feed cloning, package retention policies, CodePlex and BitBucket integration in MyGet Build Services.
  • MyGet 1.6 (February 25th): feed setting for SemVer validation, download feed as ZIP, package sources out-of-beta, lots of improvements to build services (versioning, SDKs and tools, logs, ...)
  • MyGet 1.7 (May 17th): new documentation site, search and filtering enhancements, NuGet 2.5 compatibility, Package Source Discovery, auto-publish symbols feed-setting, build service enhancements (assemblyinfo-patching, links to produced packages, support for build.ps1/.cmd/.bat, build parameters)
  • MyGet 1.8 (September 10th): NuGet 2.7 compatibility (new package restore!), auto-update metadata from upstream packages, package pinning, source labeling when pushing packages upstream, automatic package mirroring for feed-proxies, build services enhancements (build labeling compatible with GitHub releases, support for MyGet.ps1/.cmd/.bat).
  • And the obvious bug fixes (and occasionally new bugs) along the way...

We also shipped our second book: Pro NuGet, 2nd Edition (October 7th), packed with tons of new stuff and a dedicated chapter of recipes. Thanks again to Apress and the NuGet team for the high-quality reviews and helping us ship what is probably the most complete NuGet guide out there.

Let's make 2014 another great year for MyGet, NuGet and dependency management in general!

Happy New Year! And happy packaging!

PS: Let us know your feedback on what you want from MyGet in 2014 through this survey!